Posts Tagged ‘Elder Law Attorney’

2011 SuperLawyers Both: Ellen G. Makofsky and Judith B. Raskin

I am honored to announce that I have been named one of the 2011 TOP 100 SuperLawyers and one of the 50 TOP WOMEN SuperLawyers in the New York Metropolitan area. This is the third consecutive year that I have received the SuperLawyers designation , second  time I have been named to the 50 Top Women Lawyers list but the first time I have been named to the Top 100 Lawyers.

Judy Raskin, my partner at Raskin & Makofsky, has also been named to the 2011 SuperLawyers list for the second consecutive year in the Elder Law category.  In fact, she is spotlighted in the SuperLawyers publication counseling other lawyers on how to create a client-friendly office.

The SuperLawyers list is created by peer nominations and recognition plus an analysis of the nominated lawyers background, credentials, experience, honors and awards. The final SuperLawyers selection represents the top 5 percent of lawyers in New York State.

We are very proud of the work we do at Raskin & Makofsky, and are honored to have both of our firm’s partners recognized in this way.

New NAELA Leadership Position

My colleagues recently elected me to the Board of Directors of the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys (NAELA) New York Chapter at the group’s January 2011  Annual Meeting.  One of the main functions of the Chapter is to advocate and lobby for legislation which will benefit older adults and the disabled and their families.

Now is an especially auspicious time to be in a leadership position within this organization because there is much work ahead for the NAELA New York Chapter.  New York State is in the midst of a budget crunch. Governor Cuomo recently created a Medicaid Redesign Team whose purpose is to find ways to save money within the Medicaid program.  In the Governor’s 2011 proposed New York State budget he slashed $2.8 billion in spending for Medicaid programs. The likely loss of Federal matching funds will roughly double these proposed cuts to the Medicaid program.  In searching for ways to implement these cuts it is possible that spousal refusal will come under attack and that penalty periods will be proposed for those applying for Medicaid at home.

 I look forward to assisting  NAELA in advocating for the protection of those individuals who rely on the Medicaid program.  I will keep you posted on what happens next.

NY SUPERLAWYER

I am honored to have been selected as a 2010 New York Superlawyer in the area of elder law.  There are only 28 other elder law attorneys designated as New York Superlawyers this year.  Ellen Makofsky has also been named as a New York Superlawyer. It is satisfying to know that our time and effort and commitment to our work and our clients is recognized.

Long-term Care: The Middle Class Dilemma

Recently I gave the keynote address for the Annual Meeting of the Visiting Nurse Association of Long Island, Inc. I titled the presentation, “Long-term Care: The Middle Class Dilemma.” The dilemma for the middle class is having too much to qualify for Medicaid and other government benefits but too little to pay for care without spending down a lifetime of savings. Many think that as they get older Medicare will pay for all medical costs. This is a sorry fable. Medicare does not pay for the custodial care that long-term care requires.
Long-term care insurance is a good investment for those who purchase it early enough to make the insurance affordable. The problem for many is that the insurance becomes too expensive to purchase as the individual gets older or some pre-existing medical problem makes the individual uninsurable. So again it is a middle class dilemma. Recent legislative initiatives have tried to address the dilemma on the federal and state levels but none go far enough in finding a solution for the hard working middle class. Medicaid, a program originally envisioned as the medical safety net for poor people, is often the only option available for extended payments for long-term care needs. Medicaid eligibility often requires impoverishment.
It is the fear of losing a lifetime of savings if long-term care is required which sends many to seek the advice of an Elder Law attorney. Medicaid rules are complicated, often penalty periods are imposed, but generally the sooner one starts planning the better the result.
So how did this keynote address end after I had explained the difficulties of financing long-term care? I advised those present that there was one sure fire solution to the dilemma. Live a long and healthy life, enjoying everything along the way. Good advice for everyone!